Puppy Socialization – Don’t Neglect This Important Part of Training Your Dog

February 12, 2010 by  
Filed under Puppy Behavior

Let’s face it, as a new dog owner, you probably haven’t thought too much about puppy socialization. However, this is a very important part of dog training. Many cases of canine aggression could have been prevented if the dog’s owner had only known how to socialize a puppy.

Why Is It So Important To Socialize Your Dog?

When you expose your dog to lots of different people, different animals, and different places, he learns for himself that new sights, sounds, and people are fun, not scary.

It’s better to start socializing your dog while he’s still a puppy. You may not know that the best age to socialize a puppy is when he’s between the ages of three and twelve weeks. A young dog who has good experiences with new people, other dogs, and even cats will be much friendlier and less fearful of people. This helps to prevent aggressive dog behavior towards strangers when he gets older.

However, it’s never too late to socialize your dog. It may take a little longer with an older dog, but you can still use canine socialization in order to help your pooch overcome a fear of strangers and be a happier, more trustworthy friend.

What’s The Best Way To Socialize A Puppy?

Actually it’s not that difficult to socialize your dog, if you’re willing to make a little effort.

Many dog trainers suggest a puppy preschool. This is a series of group-training classes for puppies and their owners. Usually there are about 10 puppies and their people, along with a couple of dog trainers. During these classes, the puppies start to learn basic dog obedience commands like sit, stay, and others.

But the obedience lessons aren’t the most important part of puppy preschool. The play sessions are where your puppy learns essential social skills. During the play sessions, the puppies are let off their leashes and allowed to play with each other. Why is this important?

First, your puppy is learning how to get along with unfamiliar dogs.

Second, since there are other dog owners and a couple of dog trainers present, this means lots of unfamiliar people, too. This is a great way for your puppy to learn not to be afraid of new people.

Third, it’s a controlled environment. The dog trainers make sure things don’t get too wild.

Don’t Stop Puppy Socialization Too Soon

Many dog owners make the mistake of thinking that since their dog has been to puppy preschool, their puppy is now socialized. This mistaken idea can lead to problems later on.

It’s important to continue to expose your young dog to new faces, new animals, and new places. Sometimes puppies who seemed to be well socialized at a younger age “forget” those early lessons. By the time your dog is between eight months and two years old, he may become fearful of people and start showing canine aggression towards strangers.

Here’s some food for thought: even though your puppy has learned basic skills during his first few months, it’s important to keep reinforcing puppy socialization lessons throughout your dog’s life.

Darlene Norris worked at a vet clinic and an animal shelter, and has had lots of experience with dogs. Visit her new website, No More Bad Dogs, to learn more about puppy socialization. Discover which dog training course she recommends at http://NoMoreBadDogs.com

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com

Puppy Training With Patience

February 12, 2010 by  
Filed under Puppy Training

You can start training your puppy as early as 8 weeks of age. The earlier you start, the more quickly your puppy will adapt to the approach and soon will begin to respond to your command. When you take on the task of puppy training, keep in mind that puppies are full of energy and they are just learning how to act. This means that training may take some time and a little extra patience on your part, but your puppy will thank you for it.


When they are little, pups love to chew on anything and this includes your shoe or pants leg. If you want to deter this action, gently push down on your puppy’s backside and say “no”. Your puppy will soon learn that this is not acceptable and will mature into a dog that knows not to roughhouse with you.


All puppies love to play and it’s important that you spend time with them and enjoy their cute little habits and hilarious actions. While playing, it’s important to realize that the way you interact with your puppy now will have an impact on how he/she behaves with you in later years. Never play in a way that would make your puppy want to compete with humans for an object, such as tugging on a rope, which teaches your puppy aggression. Instead, playing fetch or letting your puppy chase you will be a fun way of puppy training that will show your pet how to play with people and not against them.


Some forms of puppy training can be a lot of fun, such as teaching your pet to ride in a car. If you are like some people, leaving your pet at home is just not an option. When your puppy reaches maturity, it may be a struggle to get him/her into the vehicle unless they are already familiar with the process. Most dogs behave well when riding in an automobile, but it may be a good idea to place them in a special seatbelt designed for pets just incase they become overly curious. If you practice this type of puppy training when your four-legged friend is young, he/she will be eager to jump in the car and go for a ride at anytime. This will be especially helpful during visits to the veterinarian. Otherwise, you may end up having to hoist a very large dog up into your vehicle simply because he/she is afraid and unfamiliar with the joy of a car trip.


When puppy training your furry little friend, it’s important to maintain patience and never yell at your pup. He/she very much wants to make you happy and, in order to accomplish this, they must be taught how to understand and respond to your instruction. It is also important that your puppy not be subjected to physical discipline, which may result in harm or fear. Puppy training will take both time and patience, but the end result will be a well-behaved dog that anyone will be glad to be near.


Additional information on puppy training can be found in published books, programs and videos. The best way to decide which one is right for you and you puppy is to read product reviews and compare prices to find the perfect puppy training guide.

Brian Dolezal is a contributing editor for TopConsumerReviews.com, a leading provider of independent reviews and rankings for hundreds of consumer products. You can find out how top dog training programs compare by visiting TopConsumerReviews.com today.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com

Simple Puppy Training Tips For The First Month

February 11, 2010 by  
Filed under Puppy Training

Puppy training starts as soon as your new puppy arrives at his new home. Before you bring him home look at puppy names and decide what you are callling him. Below is a list of puppy training tips to guide you during the first month of acquiring your pet.

Week One: During your puppy’s first week home (he should be around 8 weeks old), it is important to take him for a vet check up. Sample of his stool is checked for worms and preventive inoculations are given. As I said puppy training starts on day one by calling him by his new puppy name.

Set up his eating area as well as his crate or sleeping quarters. Begin the process of house training as well as collar and leash training. Watch him while he plays by himself and observe his style and personality. Play gently and enthusiastically but avoid rough housing. Say “Ok” whenever you feed him, hand him a toy or a treat as you walk out the door with him. Use plenty of praise all the time.

Week Two: As you play with your puppy, gradually add simple phrases and words into the games. If he is retrieving, say “Take it “as you throw the object. Praise him when he brings the object back to you. Say “Out” as he drops it and praise him again. Continue with “Ok” during meal, for going out, with playing, housebreaking, leash training, and observing.

Week Three: During the third week of puppy training begin to correct him gently for nipping and for chewing on shoes, cords, and furniture. Provide a toy for him to chew instead. Even if he stays inside the house, be sure to walk him around on his leash everyday. Always use eye contact. Say “Watch me” to draw his attention to your eyes. Praise him for looking at you. This method teaches him to look to you for direction.A great leash training idea is to begin tying his leash to your belt and have him trail around wherever you go; starting for a few minutes at a time, working up to an hour as it becomes easier. This will help him bond to you and will also help with his puppy training.

Start teaching table manners, beginning with “No” and “Ok” for food. Initiate the “Sit” and “Stay”, working for no more than five minutes at a time this week. If you are at home most of the time, make sure that you leave him alone for short periods of time during the day to get him used to being alone. Begin to correct the stealing of food and found objects – keeping in mind that prevention is your best correction. Correct excessive barking, noise, and whining.

Week Four: Carry on with all of the above puppy training, adding more time that he walks properly on leash. Continue practicing “No” and “Ok” with food no more than twice per week. Continue to let him explore the house under supervision, both on and off the leash. Initiate the “Come” and “Down stay” to your puppy training program. Work with your puppy no more than fifteen minutes at a time. If he is going out, you may start teaching him to “Heel” but do it very gently. Get him used to grooming procedures such as brushing, nail clipping, and occasional baths. Always make sure that every puppy training session is run as a game that way your puppy will enjoy himself whilst being trained.

John Mailer has written many articles about dogs and puppies and how to train them. Puppy Training Begin Snowboarding

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com

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